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Bird B Gone Blog

  • Protect Solar Panels from Birds and other Animals

    Solar Panel Kit Tile Roof CMYKRooftop solar panels are becoming increasingly popular, especially in sunbelt states. Unfortunately, they attract birds and other critters who seek shelter under them. When birds arrive, they create costly damage by depositing droppings that eat into the surface of solar panels. These droppings block sunlight and can reduce the overall efficiency of solar panels. What’s more, the acidic nature of bird droppings can eat into panel surfaces and the electrical wiring underneath, causing more damage and potentially dangerous shorts that could lead to a fire. Bird nesting materials built under panels make ideal kindling for such fires. Critters who seek shelter under solar panels can impede airflow, eat the insulation off wiring and again cause a fire. Fortunately, the bird control pros at Bird B Gone have a solution to this problem. Continue reading

  • Keep Pigeons from Destroying Solar Panels

    Image courtesy of Ryan Kennedy Image courtesy of Ryan Kennedy

    Many homeowners and income property owners are installing solar panels to save electricity. Trouble is, in many areas, pigeons are attracted to these panels, as they offer shade and protection to the birds. When these prolific birds flock to a roof, they create costly damage by depositing droppings that eat into the surface of solar panels. Left to gather, these droppings block sunlight and can reduce the overall efficiency of panels. In addition, nesting materials built under panels can impede airflow and can cause them to overheat, again, more damage. Fortunately, the bird control pros at Bird B Gone have a solution to this problem.

    Bird B Gone’s Solar Panel Bird Deterrent Blocks Out Pigeons

    Bird B Gone’s Solar Panel Bird Deterrent solves this problem once and for all. The deterrent includes an 8"x100 foot roll of 0.058" PVC black-coated 1/2" mesh. Specially designed solar clips (sold separately) secure the mesh to the panels. Continue reading

  • Choosing the Right Type of Bird Spikes for Your Building

    bird-deterrent-pigeonThe Problem with Feathered Pests

    As anyone who's ever owned or leased a large building can tell you, birds can be a major problem to the aesthetics of a roof. But the problems from pigeons and other airborne pests go far beyond just appearances. Besides looking ugly, bird droppings can do real damage to a roof's materials, and they carry several kinds of diseases, representing a danger to the public. That's why building owners spend plenty of time and money every year on cleaning up messes that unwanted birds leave behind.

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  • Choosing the Right Deterrent for Your Bird Problem

    goose repellentWhether it’s geese gathering on the lawn, pigeons taking up residence on the roof, or swallows building nests under the eaves of a home, it’s no secret that birds can quickly become a nuisance, damaging property if the situation isn’t controlled.

    Some birds, such as pigeons, crows, and gulls, are considered nuisance birds. They leave behind feces, which not only spread disease but can erode and stain building materials in a short amount of time. Luckily, there are bird control products available on the market that can deter birds and other critters from invading your property.

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  • Pond Netting: Protecting People, Birds, Water, and Investments

     

    pond nettingPond netting protects people, water sources, and migratory birds from some of the potentially harmful effects of development and industry. Governed by the oldest wildlife protection laws in the country, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, was established in 1919, protects birds from human activities. Here are a few ways pond netting can be used to protect water supplies, people, birds, and pocketbooks.

    Protect Water

    Development changes the land. It may mean more retail establishments, single family homes, and streets. Each of those things are harder than what was likely there before—spongy soil, trees, and plants. Continue reading

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